TAILIEUCHUNG - Customer Satisfaction Across Organizational Units

Many studies have related overall satisfaction with some product or service to satisfaction with specific aspects of the product or service (Oliver 1980, 1993; Parsuraman, Berry, and Zeithaml 1988, 1991; Anderson and Sullivan 1993; Garbarino and Johnson 1999; DeWulf, Odekerken-Schröder, and Iacobucci 2001). Customers may explain their satisfaction with a product or service in terms of specific aspects such as the product attributes, price, customer service, or a combination of these various features. The objective of such studies is to understand how specific types of customer satisfaction affect overall satisfaction, usually by examining the slopes from a regression analysis. This. | Customer Satisfaction Across Organizational Units by Edward C. Malthouse James L. Oakley Bobby J. Calder Dawn Iacobucci July 2003 Authors Note Edward C. Malthouse is an Associate Professor Integrated Marketing Communications Medill School of Journalism Northwestern University. James L. Oakley is an Assistant Professor of Management Krannert School of Management Purdue University. Bobby J. Calder is the Charles H. Kellstadt Distinguished Professor of Marketing Kellogg School of Management Northwestern University. Dawn Iacobucci is Professor of Marketing Kellogg School of Management Northwestern University. The authors would like to thank the Media Management Center at Northwestern University for financial support and assistance and Solucient for allowing us to use their Healthplus survey data. Direct all correspondence to Edward C. Malthouse Integrated Marketing Communications Northwestern University 1845 Sheridan Road Evanston IL 60208-2175 phone 847-467-3376 fax 847-491-5925 email ecm@. 1 Customer Satisfaction Across Organizational Units Abstract This paper examines customer satisfaction models for assessing the relationship of overall satisfaction with a product or service and satisfaction with specific aspects of the product or service for organizations having multiple units or subunits. These units could be stores markets dealers divisions etc. We suggest a methodology for studying whether the drivers of overall satisfaction vary across such units. For cases where the drivers do vary across subunits we show how additional variables can be included in a model to account for the variation. We illustrate this approach by studying customer satisfaction in the newspaper and healthcare industries. We use Generalizability theory can be used to evaluate the reliability of scales from multi-stage cluster sample designs. It is argued that the approach has important implications for both theory and practice. 2 Introduction Many studies have related overall

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