TAILIEUCHUNG - Withdrawing Candidate Offers

This summarizes the Company’s position on withdrawing candidate job offers. This practice is, 1) in conflict with core elements of our Purpose, Values and Principle statement, 2) damages our reputation on campus, and 3) places us in a potentially litigious situation. It is not the solution to our current budget problems, regardless of their severity. | May 2 2000 To HR Directors via . Antoine Subject Withdrawing Candidate Offers This summarizes the Company s position on withdrawing candidate job offers. This practice is 1 in conflict with core elements of our Purpose Values and Principle statement 2 damages our reputation on campus and 3 places us in a potentially litigious situation. It is not the solution to our current budget problems regardless of their severity. Background Recently a P G Business Unit Manager called a candidate who had already accepted our offer and told her that because of budget pressures her offer was withdrawn. She was not to report to work. While we are currently working to resolve this situation rumors that other Business Units may be thinking along similar lines persist. This issue has come up in the past when there has been significant pressure to protect budget commitments. Each time the collective wisdom of company management has been to make this a non-negotiable option for our managers. This year is no exception. As a promote-from-within organization we cannot afford the kind of damage reneging on offers creates to our company s reputation on campus. We have seen the impact of this behavior by other firms and have benefited from their poor judgment. The impact goes beyond the current hiring cycle and becomes embedded in campus folklore sometimes embellished beyond the actual scope of events. More importantly reneging on offers is inconsistent with our the values of trust and respect. We can not court candidates for months ask them to commit to us encourage them to turn down other opportunities and then tell them we ve cut their job before they have even started. We question the ethics of this practice when candidates do this to us. We owe them the same respect we demand from them once they have committed to us. In addition to the ethical and campus impact issues created by this practice there are potential legal consequences. It is not in our interest or our nature to violate

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